Snaefellsjokull National Park

Snaefellsjokull National Park located on the Snaefellsnes peninsula covers an area of 440 square kilometers (170 sq mi) and extends west down from the glacier-capped volcano all the way to the rugged coastline. Declared a National Park in 2001, the area has an astonishing variety in natural landscapes including moss covered lava fields, pebbled beaches and imposing rugged cliffs.

Undoubtedly the crowning jewel of Snaefellsjokull National Park is Snaefellsjokull glacier itself, which covers a dormant volcano that last erupted in 250 AD. The icy cone-shaped peak can be seen from Reykjavik on a clear day and is considered to be one of the earth’s most powerful centers of spiritual energy. The area is steeped in ancient, literary and New Age folklore and is the hometown of Gudridur Thorbjarnadottir, an Icelandic woman who traveled extensively around the world in the Middle Ages.

Although there are no campgrounds in the park, during the summer guided walks are scheduled several times a week. When hiking in this area you can expect to discover little beaches, rugged seascapes, rare plants, birdlife and seals. The seaside shore of Snaefellsnes peninsula is also a good location for spotting orca and minke whales that inhabit the surrounding ocean. The park’s Visitor Center is in the small town of Hellnar and is open daily during the summer.